China Seeking Advantages Against U.S. Forces

26 03 2009

China is seeking technology and weapons to disrupt the traditional advantages of American forces, and secrecy surrounding its military creates the potential for miscalculation on both sides, according to a Pentagon study released Wednesday.

The annual report from the Defense Department to Congress, “Military Power of the People’s Republic of China 2009,” catalogs efforts by China to supply its armed forces with weapons that can be used to intimidate and attack Taiwan and blunt the superiority of American naval and air power, at least near its territory.





Government to Supply Taiwan With $6bil of Weapons

4 10 2008

The US government has notified Congress of plans to supply Taiwan with arms worth more than $6bn (£3.4bn).

The sales include advanced interceptor missiles, Apache helicopters and submarine-launched missiles.

Correspondents say the decision is likely to anger China, which regards Taiwan as its territory and opposes US military support of the island.

The move could also complicate efforts to get North Korea, an ally of Beijing, to end its nuclear programme.

The US Defence Security Co-operation Agency (DSCA) said the sales would “help improve the security of the recipient and assist in maintaining political stability, military balance and economic progress in the region”.





Shenzhou VII Returns to Earth

28 09 2008

China’s Shenzhou VII space capsule has returned to Earth after a successful mission orbiting the planet.

The spacecraft touched down in the Mongolian desert to rapturous applause from mission control in Beijing. Looking well, the three astronauts emerged to wave to cameras before being given bouquets of flowers. While in orbit, the men conducted experiments said to be crucial to China’s space programme, as well as its first space walk.

Mission leader and fighter pilot Zhai Zhigang, 42, was first to emerge from the capsule, and is now set to be greeted as a national hero. “It was a glorious mission, full of challenges with a successful end,” he said. “We feel proud of the motherland.”

Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao, who was watching at mission control, applauded warmly and called the three men heroes. “The complete success of the manned Shenzhou VII is a great stride forward for China’s space technology,” he said.





China’s First Space Walk

27 09 2008

A Chinese astronaut has completed his country’s first-ever spacewalk as part of an ambitious program that is starting to rival the United States and Russia in its rapid expansion. var CNN_ArticleChanger = new CNN_imageChanger(‘cnnImgChngr’,’/2008/TECH/space/09/27/china.space.orbit/imgChng/p1-0.init.exclude.html’,2,1); //CNN.imageChanger.load(‘cnnImgChngr’,’imgChng/p1-0.exclude.html’);

Zhai Zhigang waved to an external camera as he emerged from the hatch of the Shenzhou-7 spaceship on Saturday.

He later held a small Chinese flag, waving it in space.

Zhai returned to the interior of his capsule and closed the hatch after less than 20 minutes outside.

State broadcaster CCTV showed live images of Zhigang as he floated out of the orbiter module’s hatch. “Greetings to all the people of the nation and all the people of the world,” The Associated Press quoted him as saying.

Fellow astronaut Liu Boming also emerged briefly from the capsule to hand Zhai the Chinese flag. The third crew member, Jing Haipeng, monitored the ship from inside the re-entry module.

The three-man crew launched from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northern China’s Inner Mongolia Thursday for a three-day mission, the highlight of which was Saturday’s spacewalk.

The spacewalk paves the way for assembling a space station from two Shenzhou orbital modules, the next major goal of China‘s manned spaceflight program. Video Watch as China’s spacecraft lifts off »

China became the third country to send people into space in 2003, when military pilot Yang Liwei circled the earth for 21 hours.

Its second mission (in 2005) had two crew members and lasted five days.

The latest mission has dominated front pages of China’s state-controlled media, knocking aside coverage of China’s continuing scandal involving contaminated milk.





China’s First Space Walk

27 09 2008

A Chinese astronaut has completed his country’s first-ever spacewalk as part of an ambitious program that is starting to rival the United States and Russia in its rapid expansion. var CNN_ArticleChanger = new CNN_imageChanger(‘cnnImgChngr’,’/2008/TECH/space/09/27/china.space.orbit/imgChng/p1-0.init.exclude.html’,2,1); //CNN.imageChanger.load(‘cnnImgChngr’,’imgChng/p1-0.exclude.html’);

Zhai Zhigang waved to an external camera as he emerged from the hatch of the Shenzhou-7 spaceship on Saturday.

He later held a small Chinese flag, waving it in space.

Zhai returned to the interior of his capsule and closed the hatch after less than 20 minutes outside.

State broadcaster CCTV showed live images of Zhigang as he floated out of the orbiter module’s hatch. “Greetings to all the people of the nation and all the people of the world,” The Associated Press quoted him as saying.

Fellow astronaut Liu Boming also emerged briefly from the capsule to hand Zhai the Chinese flag. The third crew member, Jing Haipeng, monitored the ship from inside the re-entry module.

The three-man crew launched from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northern China’s Inner Mongolia Thursday for a three-day mission, the highlight of which was Saturday’s spacewalk.

The spacewalk paves the way for assembling a space station from two Shenzhou orbital modules, the next major goal of China‘s manned spaceflight program. Video Watch as China’s spacecraft lifts off »

China became the third country to send people into space in 2003, when military pilot Yang Liwei circled the earth for 21 hours.

Its second mission (in 2005) had two crew members and lasted five days.

The latest mission has dominated front pages of China’s state-controlled media, knocking aside coverage of China’s continuing scandal involving contaminated milk.








Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.