Apple WWDC ’09

27 03 2009

June 8-12 are the dates for the 2009 Apple World-Wide Developer Conference, and the two rumors that make the most sense to us are an unveiling of a completed Snow Leopard, and a new iPhone





Snow Leopard Details

18 10 2008

Finder-

People familiar with matter say the Finder, which currently stands as
one of the oldest Carbon-based applications in the Mac OS portfolio,
has been completely re-written in the company’s native object-oriented
application program environment called Cocoa.

Apple has reportedly tapped select members of its developer community
to begin testing the updated graphical file system manager as part of a
new pre-release copy of Snow Leopard belonging to the build train
10Axxx. In addition, many of the Apple-authored applications accompany
the new build are also said to have been wrapped completely in Cocoa.

ImageBoot-

When it makes its debut, likely at WWDC 2009, Snow Leopard will also
introduce a new, third option for disc image-based installation called
ImageBoot. Based on Apple’s existing NetBoot technology, which allows
Macs to boot from a remote disk over the network, ImageBoot will allow
users to set up any number of disk images on a secondary partition or
external drive, and then selectively boot their system from any one of
those disk images at startup.

This new feature will allow users to set up a series of test
environments or uniquely configured Mac OS X systems, store the
bootable systems as discrete disk images, and subsequently store
multiple boot targets on the same disk or partition. Currently, only
one bootable Mac OS X installation can be stored on a given disk
partition.

With ImageBoot, multiple NetBoot sets can be maintained locally on the
same storage partition, and the user can select any one of the disk
images available to boot from without having to restore or mount the
disk image first. The result is a system that works similar to
virtualization software such as Parallels, which can create disk images
for different PC operating systems and selectively boot from any of
them. The difference is that Mac OS X isn’t booting up in a virtual
environment; it actually boots a fully native Mac OS X system.





Snow Leopard Details

18 10 2008

Finder-

People familiar with matter say the Finder, which currently stands as
one of the oldest Carbon-based applications in the Mac OS portfolio,
has been completely re-written in the company’s native object-oriented
application program environment called Cocoa.

Apple has reportedly tapped select members of its developer community
to begin testing the updated graphical file system manager as part of a
new pre-release copy of Snow Leopard belonging to the build train
10Axxx. In addition, many of the Apple-authored applications accompany
the new build are also said to have been wrapped completely in Cocoa.

ImageBoot-

When it makes its debut, likely at WWDC 2009, Snow Leopard will also
introduce a new, third option for disc image-based installation called
ImageBoot. Based on Apple’s existing NetBoot technology, which allows
Macs to boot from a remote disk over the network, ImageBoot will allow
users to set up any number of disk images on a secondary partition or
external drive, and then selectively boot their system from any one of
those disk images at startup.

This new feature will allow users to set up a series of test
environments or uniquely configured Mac OS X systems, store the
bootable systems as discrete disk images, and subsequently store
multiple boot targets on the same disk or partition. Currently, only
one bootable Mac OS X installation can be stored on a given disk
partition.

With ImageBoot, multiple NetBoot sets can be maintained locally on the
same storage partition, and the user can select any one of the disk
images available to boot from without having to restore or mount the
disk image first. The result is a system that works similar to
virtualization software such as Parallels, which can create disk images
for different PC operating systems and selectively boot from any of
them. The difference is that Mac OS X isn’t booting up in a virtual
environment; it actually boots a fully native Mac OS X system.





Mac OS X Security Update 2008-007

10 10 2008

Apple on Thursday afternoon released its seventh distinct security fix of the year for Mac OS X to tackle a number flaws, including one introduced with its 10.5.5 update.

Available for both Mac OS X Leopard (Client, Server) and Tiger (Intel Client, PowerPC Client, PowerPC Server), Security Update 2008-007 addresses a mixture of UNIX foundation and Mac-specific flaws.

Among the fixes is one for the launchd daemon that only affects Mac OS X 10.5.5. The particular implementation may sometimes fail to sandbox apps that want to be isolated from the system, potentially exposing them to attacks.

Other Mac-related problems mended in the were first discovered by outside security teams, including a remote CUPS printing exploit found by TippingPoint’s Zero Day Initiative as well as holes in ColorSync, Finder, general Mac OS X networking, PSNormalizer, QuickLook, root certificates, Script Editor and Weblog.

A pair of additional, special patches close vulnerabilities in the third-party ClamAV utility and allow a single sign-on with a password in a file, allowing scripts to use the sign-on feature without dropping security.

Solutions for UNIX flaws include updated versions of Apache, libxslt, MySQL Server, PHP, Postfix, rlogin, Tomcat and vim.





Apple Recieves Dock Patent

9 10 2008

After nearly 9 years, Apple CEO Steve Jobs and company were awarded this week with a patent for their implementation of a software-based computer dock that has since become a trademark of the Mac OS X operating system.

On Tuesday, the United States Patent and Trademark Office granted the Mac maker patent number 7,434,177 titled “User interface for providing consolidation and access.” The 20-page filing outlining the principles behind the Dock and its magnification component is credited to Jobs, in addition to well-known Apple interface designers Bas Ording and Donald Lindsay.

Apple now retains the exclusive right to prevent others from making, using, selling, or otherwise employing replicas of the technology in their own products. Under United States patent law, that right typically extends 20 years assuming the company keeps up with routine maintenance fees due 3½, 7½ and 11½ years following the grant date.





Apple OS X Leopard 10.5.5

15 09 2008

Apple on Monday released Mac OS X 10.5.5, a recommended update for all users of Mac OS X 10.5.x Leopard that includes over a hundred bug fixes and more than two dozen security enhancements.

As of press time, the 321MB update was only available via the Software Update mechanism located under the Apple menu of your Mac.

In addition to general stability improvements and over two dozen security enhancements, the update addresses issues with Address Book, Disk Utility, iCal, Mail, MobileMe, and Time Machine. A detailed list of those fixes follows:

General

  • Includes recent Apple security updates.
  • Addresses stability issues with video playback, processor core idling, and remote disc sharing for MacBook Air.
  • Addresses an issue in which some Macs could unexpectedly power on at the same time each day.
  • Resolves a stability issue in TextEdit that could be found when accessing the color palette.
  • Improves Spotlight indexing performance.
  • Fixes an issue in which contacts might not sync properly with PalmOS-based devices.
  • Improves iPhone sync reliability with iCal and Address Book.
  • Includes improvements to Active Directory (see this article for more information).
  • Improves Speech Dictionary.
  • Fixes Kerberos authentication issues for Mac OS X 10.5 clients that connect to certain Samba servers, such as Mac OS X Server version 10.4.
  • Includes extensive graphics enhancements.

Address Book

  • Addresses stability issues that may occur when creating a Smart Group.
  • Resolves a printing issue with address cards containing information that spans more than one page.

Disk Utility and Directory Utility

  • Improves reliability when rebuilding a software mirror RAID volume in Disk Utility.
  • Improves reliability of server status displayed in Directory Utility.

iCal

  • Updates iCal to more accurately handle repeating events.
  • Improves performance when choosing meeting attendees.
  • Resolves an issue in which the “Refresh All” option may be dimmed (“grayed out”) in the contextual menu for certain calendars.
  • Fixes issues with read-only calendars.
  • Addresses an issue that prevents an invitee from moving an event to a different calendar.
  • Resolves an issue with syncing published calendars.

Mail

  • Addresses performance issues related to displaying IMAP messages.
  • Resolves an issue with SMTP settings for AIM, Compuserve, Hanmail, Yahoo!, and Time Warner Road Runner email accounts.
  • Addresses stability issues that may occur when dragging a file to the Mail icon in the Dock.
  • Addresses an issue with the “Organized by Thread” view in which the date does not appear when the thread is collapsed.
  • Resolves an issue in which RSS feeds could temporarily disappear from the sidebar.
  • Improves Mail robustness when sending messages.
  • Improves reliability when saving drafts that have attachments.

MobileMe

  • Improves overall sync reliability.
  • Improves Back to My Mac reliability.

Time Machine

  • Improves Time Machine reliability with Time Capsule.
  • Addresses performance issues that may affect initial and in-progress backups.
  • Fixes an issue in which an incorrect alert message could appear stating that a backup volume does not have enough free space.
  • Time Machine can now back up iPhone backups that are on your Mac, as well as other items in (~/Library/Application Support).







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