Palin Email ‘Hacker’ Faces 5yrs in Prison

9 10 2008

If prosecutors have their way, David Kernell, the 20 year old son of a Tennessee state representative and prime suspect in the Sarah Palin email hack will make an inmate looking for a young, supple jailhouse bride very happy. He was indicted today by a federal grand jury in Knoxville, Tenn for illegally accessing the account and faces up to 5 years in prison, a $250,000 fine and a three-year term of supervised release. A trial date has not been set, but it is safe to say that things don’t look good.

I’d like to remind people that all he did was get the security question right…  IT’S PARTLY SARAH PALIN’S FAULT SHE DIDN’T USE A MORE DIFFICULT QUESTION.  Her question and answer were MAINSTREAM INFORMATION.

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Alaska’s “Bridge to Nowhere”

21 09 2008

Alaska may not have a “Bridge to Nowhere,” but it now has a “Road to Nowhere.”

This week, the state completed a $25 million gravel road that was intended to lead up to the bridge linking the city of Ketchikan to its airport on a neighboring island.

The bridge project became the symbol of federal largess, and Congress eventually dropped the earmark for the bridge.

The state still received the money, but last fall, Gov. Sarah Palin killed the project, valued at nearly $400 million.

Ketchikan Mayor Bob Weinstein said the 3.2-mile road now is ideal for road races and hunting and possibly some commercial development. But with no bridge to serve it, that’s probably about it.

The bridge has also become a focal point in the presidential race with Palin, now GOP presidential nominee John McCain’s running mate, repeatedly telling crowds that she told Congress “thanks but no thanks” for that Bridge to Nowhere.

The state is considering cheaper designs for a bridge. State lawmakers made a brief attempt at securing funding for a bridge during this year’s legislative session.

The two-bridge project would have connected the town’s airport on Gravina Island to Revillagigedo Island, where most of the 13,000 residents of the Ketchikan Gateway Borough live.

The airport is separated from its users by a quarter-mile-wide channel of water, forcing travelers to catch either a ferry or a water taxi.





Alaska’s “Bridge to Nowhere”

21 09 2008

Alaska may not have a “Bridge to Nowhere,” but it now has a “Road to Nowhere.”

This week, the state completed a $25 million gravel road that was intended to lead up to the bridge linking the city of Ketchikan to its airport on a neighboring island.

The bridge project became the symbol of federal largess, and Congress eventually dropped the earmark for the bridge.

The state still received the money, but last fall, Gov. Sarah Palin killed the project, valued at nearly $400 million.

Ketchikan Mayor Bob Weinstein said the 3.2-mile road now is ideal for road races and hunting and possibly some commercial development. But with no bridge to serve it, that’s probably about it.

The bridge has also become a focal point in the presidential race with Palin, now GOP presidential nominee John McCain’s running mate, repeatedly telling crowds that she told Congress “thanks but no thanks” for that Bridge to Nowhere.

The state is considering cheaper designs for a bridge. State lawmakers made a brief attempt at securing funding for a bridge during this year’s legislative session.

The two-bridge project would have connected the town’s airport on Gravina Island to Revillagigedo Island, where most of the 13,000 residents of the Ketchikan Gateway Borough live.

The airport is separated from its users by a quarter-mile-wide channel of water, forcing travelers to catch either a ferry or a water taxi.





Sarah Palin’s Speech Good For Republicans AND Democrats

6 09 2008

 

Sarah Palin’s speech to the convention Wednesday night energized conservatives, allayed concerns of some nervous party insiders – and inspired excited Republicans to donate a cool $1 million to the Republican National Committee’s effort to elect John McCain.

The donations, which came in over the Internet in the hours after the speech, will add to the massive war chest that the Republican Party has built up for the fall contest. A Republican aide leaked us the news that the Republican National Committee ended the month of August with $75 million in the bank.

That’s more than the total that the Democratic National Committee and Barack Obama had in the bank at the end of July. Neither Obama nor the DNC have released their cash on hand figures for August. But the DNC had just $5 million in the bank at the end of July. Meanwhile, Sen. Obama would have been foolish to keep much money in the bank at the end of August because all money raised for the primary campaign had to be spent by the time he officially became a general-election candidate at the Democratic convention last week.

Sen. McCain had $32.8 million in the bank at the end of July, but probably has a zero balance now.

The RNC says donations began pouring in over the Internet soon after Palin began speaking. McCain also got a few last-minute donations. Once McCain accepts the Republican nomination for president tonight, he will no longer be allowed to accept private donations because he as opted to accept $85 million in federal financing for his campaign.

One of the those now inspired to donate to the McCain cause is Aimee Berger, a 42-year old uber-housewife, who voted for Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney in the Republican primary. Berger had planned to vote for McCain, but until last night said she wasn’t going to open up her pocketbook. “Governor Palin has showed America, and women, and our daughters that you can do anything,” she said.

Bloomberg reported that Palin’s speech was even better for Democrats–Barack Obama has raised $8 million since Wednesday’s speech. “Sarah Palin’s attacks have rallied our supporters in ways we never expected,” Obama campaign spokesman Bill Burton said. “And we fully expect John McCain’s attacks tonight to help us make our grassroots organization even stronger.”